Motor bikes and moonlight

Saturday 13th August

Since I first came to Uganda, 18 months ago, I have been amazed at what people can carry on motorbikes. Mostly, the bikes are small and a 250 cc machine would be considered very big and flashy. They are driven fairly slowly and have very efficient silencers. (Pity the lorries don’t as well)

It is common to see the family out on their motorbike; Dad driving, Mum at the back, and between them sometimes three or four children.  When the kids grow to the point of Mum being at risk of falling off the back, the older ones are discouraged from riding any more.

What is unusual, to western eyes, are the goods that carried on motorbikes. It is common to see several boxes strapped down; sometimes several 20 litre jerry cans full of water, a pile of pineapples, clothing, wood, charcoal etc., all tied down in a variety of ways.

But these are my top six most unlikely things I have seen on motorbikes.

6. Chickens. Sometimes quite a lot. They are alive and have their legs tied. Sometimes they are arranged so that three of four heads are dangling off each side of the bike. They do not seem at all distressed by this. There is no flapping or squawking. Apparently, the common “village chicken” is docile when it is held captive. It knows when to keep still and not make a fuss.

5. Pigs. Never more than one at a time and always riding side-saddle. Again, their legs are tied and again they are quite docile and well behaved. I have seen one put on a motorbike, though, and there was a lot of complaint in the process.

4. A full size metal door. This was held on by the passenger. He held it an angle which made it similar to an aircraft wing and I wondered what the take-off speed was likely to be and if he would be alone in this aerial adventure or whether he would take the driver with him.

3. Fridges and a full sized freezer. Also carried across the back of the bike. To get the balance right, one end of the fridge or freezer extends out further than the other. The tradition is to stick the longer end out into the approaching traffic.

2. Five metre long concrete reinforcing rods. These are carried six at a time and draped across the back of the bike, forming into a U shape behind the bike and scraping along the ground on both sides behind you. If travelling on dirt roads, they raise an interesting dust cloud. If they are on tarmac, they give off sparks (spectacular at night) and arrive a bit shorter than when they set off.

1. But my number one choice is …..Goats. Goats are intelligent creatures and not amused by motor bikes. They will certainly have a nibble at bike wiring and plastic bits but are not keen on riding one. They are familiar with them because goats regularly graze roadside verges and learn to keep out of the way of motorbikes. However goats trust humans (odd because they kill and eat them, but there you are). So the trick is to attach the goat to the rider and not to the bike.

The goat is wrapped like a belt round the rider’s waist so that the head and neck are at the front and the legs are tied at the back. This has the added advantage of being able to fondle the goat’s ears as you are riding. Again, the goat does not seem distressed by this treatment and remains docile.

We have just returned from supper by Lake Victoria. We sat at a small table ten feet from waves sploshing on the shore. A bright moon directly overhead reflected in every wavelet as it broke at our feet. This is the largest lake in Africa and the second largest in the World (after Lake Superior in Canada). For all practical purposes, it is a sea. Egrets and kingfishers sat on a tree a little out in the water, making the occasional dive into the blackness beneath.

Across the water, way below the horizon, is Kenya. Nearby small fishing boats netted shoals of small sparkling tilapia in front of us. Along the beach, a competing café employed local musicians pounding drums. The sun set within 30 minutes, as we are close to the Equator, and the stars came out rapidly all over us. It was all rather magical.

By popular request, there are no funny names today, but here are a few interesting things seen on the road (apart from the motorbikes):

Lady construction workers wearing hard hats, high visibility jackets and sparkly flip flops.

A matatu (mini-bus taxi) where one passenger was carrying a metal rod so long it was outside the bus held by his hand through the window. The rod was held vertically and the top was just lower than overhead electricity lines.

A breakdown truck owned by a firm called “Master of Disaster”

A government pick-up truck with the name “Residual Indoor Spraying Unit” on the door. I could not even guess what this branch of the civil service does (although a number of amusing possibilities occurred to me) but when I Googled it, it turns about to about spraying the inside of houses to kill malaria carrying mosquitos.

More soon. Meanwhile here is a picture of the sunrise over Wanale Cliffs at Mbale, near the border with Kenya.IMGP6269

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